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By Gary Carey

The meaninglessness and randomness of existence was once a relentless subject matter in Camus's writing. This tale is absurd, but touches a chord in the reader that definitely will resonate for future years. a guy is condemned to beheading simply because he was once detached at his mother's funeral. In felony he reveals freedom and happiness. demise turns into his maximum second of existence.

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Camus. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. 1959. _____. 3 (1961): 3-10. BRUCKBERGER, RAYMOND-LEOPOLD. 2 (1954): 70-80. CRUICKSHANK, JOHN. Albert Camus and the Literature of Revolt. London: Oxford University Press. 1959. FRANK, WALDO. " New Repubhc CXXXIII (September 19, 1955): 18-20. FROHOCK, W. M. 2 (Fourth Study): 91-99. GERSHMAN, HERBERT S. 4 (1956): 299-305. HANNA, THOMAS. The Thought and Art ofAlbert Camus. Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1958. HARRINGTON, MICHAEL. " Commonweal LXIII (1956): 224-33.

To him, it seems as though he has been excluded from the trial entirely and that his fate is to be decided with his having little to do with the matter. Tide-like, Meursault's fascination with the trial ebbs and recedes; he listens intently, wanting to protest, then drifts away, only half-hearing the vindictive voice of the prosecutor. Meursault is aware of the prosecutor's gestures and his elaborate phrases, but even these, he admits, catch only isolated moments of his attention. " Camus' ironic sense of comedy is included in the prosecutor's tirades.

BREARLEY, KATHERINE. 3 (1962): 117-22. BRÉE, GERMAINE. 1 (1950): 27-37. _____. Camus. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. 1959. _____. 3 (1961): 3-10. BRUCKBERGER, RAYMOND-LEOPOLD. 2 (1954): 70-80. CRUICKSHANK, JOHN. Albert Camus and the Literature of Revolt. London: Oxford University Press. 1959. FRANK, WALDO. " New Repubhc CXXXIII (September 19, 1955): 18-20. FROHOCK, W. M. 2 (Fourth Study): 91-99. GERSHMAN, HERBERT S. 4 (1956): 299-305. HANNA, THOMAS. The Thought and Art ofAlbert Camus.

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